Emblems, not literal flesh and blood…

This was not done to offer himself often, as when the high priest enters into the holy place from year to year with blood that is not his own. Otherwise, he would have to suffer often from the founding of the world. But now he has manifested himself once for all time at the conclusion of the systems of things to do away with sin through the sacrifice of himself.

======================================================

The unleavened bread and red wine served at the Memorial are emblems, or symbols, of Christ’s flesh and blood. They are not miraculously changed into or mixed with his literal flesh and blood, as some feel. Consider the Scriptural basis for this understanding.

If Jesus had commanded his disciples to drink his blood, he would have been telling them to break God’s law against consuming blood.  Yet this could not be, for Jesus would never instruct others to violate God’s law regarding the sacredness of blood.

If the apostles had been literally drinking Jesus’ blood, he would not have said that his blood “is to be poured out,” indicating that his sacrifice was yet to occur.

Jesus’ sacrifice took place “once for all time.”  However, if the bread and wine were changed into his flesh and blood during the Lord’s Evening Meal, then those partaking would be repeating that sacrifice.

Jesus said: “Keep doing this in remembrance of me,” not “in sacrifice of me.”

Those who believe in transubstantiation, that the bread and wine become Jesus’ literal body and blood, base this doctrine on the wording of certain Bible verses. For example, in many Bible translations, Jesus is recorded as saying of the wine: “This is my blood.”  However, Jesus’ words can also be translated as: “This means my blood,” “This represents my blood,” or “This signifies my blood.”  As he had often done, Jesus was teaching by using a metaphor.

Advertisements

~ by DJ Camstar on 16/04/2017.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: